May Poetry Retreat

With March underway, it’s time to start thinking about spring. I’m looking forward to doing a few poetry readings during the warmer months, and my creative juices always flow a little easier once winter is in the rear-view. If you’re looking for a writing retreat, I highly suggest the poetry retreat at King’s College in Wilkes-Barre, PA on Saturday, May 11. The cost is only $25 and includes lunch and dinner, several workshops, readings, and reserved space to write and/or read. I’ll be one of the workshop leaders, most likely teaching a fun class on incorporating pop culture into writing. If interested, check out the RVSP form.

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Writer’s Showcase: All-Female/Winter Edition

The next installment of the Writer’s Showcase at the Olde Brick Theater in Scranton will take place on Saturday, Feb. 9 at 7 p.m. This one will be the annual all-female Showcase, featuring live readings of poetry and prose by Kimberly Boland, Aurora Bonner, Rachael Hughes, Laurel Radzieski, and Alyssa Waugh.

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Author bios:

Kimberly Boland writes poetry, prose, and drama. She is a recent graduate of Keystone College, where she received her bachelor’s of arts degree in Communication Arts and Humanities, and she’s continuing her studies at Gonzaga University where she has just begun her master’s of arts degree in Communication and Leadership Studies. She lives in North Abington Township in her beloved farmhouse home with her cherished, loving family, and her hobbies include tabletop board gaming, swing dancing, listening to audio dramas, and being active in her synagogue’s community. Her first prose poetry chapbook, titled Maybe This Is It, an analysis and reflection on overcoming destruction, told through a feminist lens, came out in 2017 and she hopes to follow it up with a sequel of equally autobiographical poems soon.

Aurora D. Bonner is an environmentally driven writer and artist living in the Endless Mountains of Pennsylvania. She is a regular review contributor for the Colorado Review and her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Brevity, Assay: Journal of Nonfiction, Under the Gum Tree, and Hippocampus Magazine. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Wilkes University. Follow her @aurora_bonner or aurorabonner.com for more information.

Rachael J. Hughes writes with retractable, comfort-grip PaperMate Ink Joy pens in groovy hues. She was founder of Word Fountain and earned her Creative Writing MFA at the Maslow Family Graduate Program in Creative Writing at Wilkes University. She strives to make the world laugh, heal, and love books. She is the author of Us Girls: My Life Without a Uterus. She writes and resides in Central Pennsylvania with her family, including four cats. Check out her musical musings at: http://kindalikeapoet.wordpress.com.

Laurel Radzieski’s debut poetry collection, Red Mother, was published by NYQ Books in 2018. She earned her MFA in Creative Writing from Goddard College and her BA from Keystone College. She has been a Writer-in-Residence at the Wormfarm Institute and is a poetry editor for Clockhouse. Laurel’s poems has appeared in The Golden Key, Really System, The Slag Review and elsewhere, including on roadsides in rural Wisconsin. She has worn many hats in the theatre and can often be found writing on-the-spot poems for strangers at local events. Laurel lives in Scranton with her husband and a fish named Buddy.

Alyssa Waugh is the editor of I AM STRENGTH: True Stories of Everyday Superwomen and the author of Hell’s Laughter and Other Spooky Tales. Her short stories have been published in Beyond Science Fiction Literary Magazine, her poetry has been featured on Writing in a Woman’s Voice, and she won first place in Inkitt’s Running Scared Horror Writing Contest. She is a manuscript reader for the James Jones Novel Writing Competition, a copy editor for Etruscan Press, and teaches creative writing classes at King’s College and fiction workshops at Wilkes University where she received her M.F.A. These days she spends most of her time as the Editor in Chief of Blind Faith Books and trying to write without her cats stealing her pens. You can learn more about her at alyssawaugh.com and blindfaithbooks.com.

Check out the Facebook event page for additional info.

Dark Ink: A Poetry Anthology Inspired by Horror

The fine folks at Moon Tide Press  have put together an anthology entitled Dark Ink: A Poetry Anthology  Inspired by Horror, set for release in October. The collection includes 66 poets overall, including yours truly. If interested in pre-ordering a copy,  just click here. Scroll to the bottom of the page to see the link.

The official book launch is scheduled for Saturday, November 3rd at the Whittier Museum in Whittier, CA. Readers from the anthology will share their poems and the work of others in the book. Copies will be available. Complimentary refreshments and food will be provided.

A Little Bit of Poetry News/Hazleton Arts Fest

I’m taking a slight pause from my usual blogging about the world of horror films to announce a few poetry-related items.

First, Daryl Sznyter and I will be participating in the first ever Anthracite Arts Festival this weekend in Hazleton, PA. Most of the events will be taking place at the Hazleton Arts League. Check out the flyer below because all of the events sound unique and engaging. On Saturday, from 6-10, we’ll be hosting an open mic, and we’ll also be reading some poems and will have books for sale.

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Second, I have two poems, “April Light,” and “What You Learn about the House,” in the new issue of Still: The Journal. They can be read here, and make sure to check out the rest of the issue, too.

Lastly, I have a review of Wendy Chen’s debut poetry collection, Unearthings, over at 4squarereview.com. You can check that out here. I can’t even begin to say how much I loved this book. Keep your eye out for her work. She’s a poet to watch.

 

 

Some Poetry News

I’m breaking briefly from the blog content I’ve been posting lately to share a little bit of poetry news.

First, I am happy to announce that I have two poems in the new issue of Ovunque Siamo: New Italian-American Writing. You can read the poems, “Praise Poem for After the Storm,” and “Punk Goes Acoustic,” here.  The entire issue is worth a read and features  poetry, nonfiction, fiction, and book reviews.

Another poem, “Praising the Familiar,” was recently featured as the poem of the week by Zingara Poetry Review. You can read that here.

Over at 4squarereview, I had the chance to review Amy Lawless’ new collection, Broadax. This is a book I highly recommend. It is fierce and funny.  You can read the review here.

Lastly, I will be taking part in the release party for the anthology Misrepresented People: Poetic Responses to Trump’s America on Sunday, March 18 at the Bowery Poetry Club in NYC.  The reading begins at 3:30 pm. All proceeds from the anthology benefit the National Immigration Law Center. You can check out the Facebook event page here.

 

Some Poetry News

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I wanted to share a quick update on the poetry front. I have a new review published over at 4squarereview on Ariel Francisco’s latest collection, All My Heroes Are Broke. I really like his work, and in the context of the immigration debates occurring in the U.S., his poetry feels especially powerful and resonant at this moment. Check out the review here. 

I also have three poems in the new anthology Misrepresented People: Poetic Responses to Trump’s America, out this month through NYQ Books. The collection includes work by Patricia Smith, Kaveh Akbar, Ariel Fransisco, Kyle Dargan, Gregory Parldo, Maria Mazziotti Gillan, and dozens of others. Proceeds will be donated to the National Immigration Law Center. You can order a copy through several retailers. Click here for more info. There will be a launch in mid-March at the Bowery Poetry Club in NYC.