New Review

I wanted to share a review written by Dante Di Stefano for Waiting to the Dead to Speak, published by Arcadia Press. I am grateful for this thoughtful review and the context Dante places the book in, post-election, namely the class issues. You can check it out here.  Here is an exert:

The Scranton, Pennsylvania of Waiting for the Dead to Speak, a place freighted with pasts and vanishings, could be anywhere in Middle America; Fanelli’s poetry mainlines anthracite and coal dust, caked in creosote and lye, in order to deliver a rustbelt bucolic in which empathy outflanks hate.

Next post, I’ll reflect on 2016, and share some of my favorite films and books of the year.

Two New Reviews

I had the chance to review two new collections of poetry for At the Inkwell and TheThePoetry, George Wallace’s A Simple Blues with a Few Intangibles (FootHills Publishing) and Stay with Me Awhile by Loren Kleinman (Winter Goose Publishing).

Checkout the review of Wallace’s book here, and check out the review of Kleinman’s new collection here.

New Reviews

I wanted to share two new reviews of my poetry collection, All That Remains. The first review was published in the Maine-based journal Off the Cost. Initially, the review was published in print only, but the editors recently uploaded content online. The reviewer, Richard Aston, says of the collection: “All That Remains works as a maturing of Fanelli’s previously published chapbook Front Man. Now he is in a position to branch out to the larger community beyond his personal experience, both in terms of personal story and time line; that which follows from the kind of study and scholarly research that will make him an excellent teacher and writer. The future may bring modifications in form, both of the line and the work itself. Whether the future form he uses is formalist or experimentimental, a doff to poetic traditions of rhyme and meter is in order.”

The other review was published by [PANK] today and written by Tricia Fidler, who had a lot of kind words to say about the book. She writes: “Like a Dylan or Springsteen record deserves more than one spin, Brian Fanelli’s All That Remains is a book that deserves more than one read. Rich in small town culture, this collection is filled with characters that have overcome the losses in life, but it doesn’t forget those who have not. It is down-to-earth and true to those often overlooked groups, the young idealists and the rural working class. Fanelli’s lyrical rhythms whisper and howl, croon and screech, reminding us there will be repercussions for every loss. At the same time, the collection leaves us with the extraordinary hope that it seems only music can bring. For whenever the music stops and all that remains are the ghostly echoes of silence, there will always be the remnants of a song.”

Many thanks to the writers for these reviews, and if you haven’t had a chance to pick up a copy of the book, please do. I’d appreciate the support. Let me know what you think of it!

New Review/New Poems

TheThePoetry has posted a new review of my collection All That Remains written by Scott Thomas. In the review, Thomas writes, “Fanelli’s work is approachable. He does not brandish his technical prowess with intimidating sestinas. There is no pandering to theory, nor does he flaunt his erudition by quoting obscure thinkers or having his characters speak in Latin. (Though there are some well-placed references to Bob Dylan and horror movies.) What we do find are rusting towns and their hard-working denizens, whose horizons are limited through no fault of their own. We also catch moments of tenderness and regret and glimpses of youth with chances seized or lost.”

He concludes the review with the line, “Fanelli writes about fates that he himself has escaped, but he is unwilling to turn his back, to say: ‘I’m out of here. You’re on your own.’”

If you haven’t checked out TheThePoetry, I suggest bookmarking it and visiting frequently. They run several reviews a month, as well as interviews, essays, and spotlights on different poetry communities across the nation.

In addition, I have three new poems in the new issue of Fledging Rag, which is only available in print through Iris G. Press. The issue is impressive and features a wide range of forms and voices, including three poems by my friend and fellow Wilkes M.F.A. alum Chris Bullard.